Golf Ball Dispenser Functions

We supply golf-ball dispensers to suit most types of application. There are two basic modes of dispensing; the ‘tip tray’ type and the ‘single ball count’ type. The ‘tip tray’ machines drop a measured volume of balls, say 25 with each tip. Depending on the specification requested, machines can be set to deliver more than one basket size for different prices. A delivery of 100

The ‘tip tray’ machines drop a measured volume of balls, say 25 with each tip. Depending on the specification requested, machines can be set to deliver more than one basket size for different prices. A delivery of 100 would therefore require the machine to tip four times. On ‘single ball count’

On ‘single ball count’ machines each ball is counted by an infra- red beam until the required number has been delivered. Operational advantages of this type are that it allows basket sizes to be set which are not multiples of a basic tip amount, and that it allows a choice of bonus balls or discounted price. The control mechanism and electronics are more complicated on the ‘single ball count’ units and are therefore not offered as an option on lower priced machines. A summary of the functions of each type of controller is as follows:

TYPE 1: ‘Tip tray’ machines only: No customer display screen; continuously- lit green panel light indicates machine is ready to use and flashing green light indicates a fault. Four inputs, each of which can be configured either to facilitate 1, 2, 3 or 4 tips (depending on the particular input used) with tokens or to allow up to four cash coins to be used (each input being assigned a fixed relative coin value) to total up a delivery price for a single programmable cash amount. Prevalidated card reader can be connected to allow customers to bulk- purchase. A tip counter can be fitted if required. This unit has no memory storage and no facility to retrieve log files for print – outs. A re- settable overload button protects the unit in the event of a motor jam.

Prevalidated card reader can be connected to allow customers to bulk- purchase. A tip counter can be fitted if required. This unit has no memory storage and no facility to retrieve log files for print – outs. A re- settable overload button protects the unit in the event of a motor jam.

TYPE 2: Can be used on ‘tip tray’ and ‘single ball count’ dispensers: Display screen with green and red panel lights. Up to four push buttons to enable customers to select delivery size before inserting cash. Four token sizes also available: Pre- validated card reader can be installed: Note reader can be installed: All transactions are logged in memory for two days and daily totals are retained for eight days; a summary of the logged data can be printed out using a small hand- held

All transactions are logged in memory for two days and daily totals are retained for eight days; a summary of the logged data can be printed out using a small hand- held

TYPE 3: Has all of the features of type 2. As well as all the listed means of payment it can accommodate a swipe card and/or barcode reader and a numeric keypad. In addition it can be connected in a network of up to eight dispensers to a P.C. running Point- of- Sale software. This allows a golf facility to issue loyalty cards to members who can then deposit funds

This allows a golf facility to issue loyalty cards to members who can then deposit funds on account in return for preferential ball prices. Many marketing aids are featured within the software, facilitating pre- payments, group pricing, bonuses and convenient ‘bonus periods’ to individual member categories; analysis, audit and reporting functions are also incorporated. Members may be allowed to top- up their loyalty accounts at the dispenser, for convenience or to save queuing at reception, and a panel printer can be fitted to the dispenser to print a receipt for the cash deposited. The keypad is for non- members to access balls in the same way that they can with tokens, using the pad to enter a random number issued at the computer and printed onto a voucher. This is much more secure for a golf facility than the token. Once a voucher has been used, further attempts to use it will be blocked. The voucher can be set to be valid only at certain times of the day and its validity can also be programmed to expire after a specified number of days.

The keypad is for non- members to access balls in the same way that they can with tokens, using the pad to enter a random number issued at the computer and printed onto a voucher. This is much more secure for a golf facility than the token. Once a voucher has been used, further attempts to use it will be blocked. The voucher can be set to be valid only at certain times of the day and its validity can also be programmed to expire after a specified number of days.